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Karta Idrijca   Klavže on the Idrijca River
ABOUT THE PARK
NATURAL FEATURES WITHIN THE PARK
A STROLL THROUGH THE PARK
FROM IDRIJA TO THE LAKE DIVJE JEZERO
STRUG VALLEY (The Village of Idrijska Bela)
THE IDRIJCA RIVER from LAJŠT TO ITS SPRING

Lauf – forest railway
Landslides beneath Tratnik
Kramarš'ca
Klavže on the Idrijca river
Klavžar’s house

 
THE BELCA RIVER from LAJŠT TO ITS SPRING
THE EDGE OF TRNOVSKI GOZD
TOURISM AND RECREATION
 PROTECTIVE MEASURES
PHOTO GALLERY
USEFUL LINKS
 
DEITSLEN  
 
 
 
  Klavže are water barriers that were used for wood drifting to satisfy the needs of the mine, the also portray one of the most valuable technical monuments in Slovenia.

Since the surrounding area of Idrija was practically impassable, without any roads and covered in rugged terrain, the Idrijca river proved to be the optimum transport route. The mine required large amounts of wood on a yearly basis, up to World War II around 4 million m² of wood had been used. The Idrijca river along with its confluents turned out to be the most effective route for transport. The first klavže were built as early as the end of the 16th century. and the brick klavže, preserved to this day, were built from 1767 to 1772.

 
 
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They were designed by Jožef Mrak, cartographer, land surveyor and lecturer. Considering that klavže on the Idrijca river are the largest and used to hold the maximum quantity of water – their brick walls being more than 10 m thick and 44 m wide at the upper end – then Putrih’s klavže are without doubt among the most picturesque on the Belca river. They are placed between the precipitous cliffs where the valley closes up and narrows. All of the klavže had double doors which were opened when the dam was full and beneath the klavže the rushing water carried the prepared wood following its course all the way to Idrija. The vast river rakes in the town stopped the drifting wood, but the water flooded the riverbanks and often caused some damage and then calmly continued on its path. The biographer for Slovenian inventors claims that the klavže stand out due to their uniqueness and massive construction among the those type of technical monuments in our area and around the world.

Stanislav Mazi describes the wood drifting: “When opening the doors, the barrier needed to be lifted, the break removed and then the water came gushing through the door and squirting through the channels. It did not even flow, its pressure was too powerful and its quantity was exceeding: anyone who had the courage to observe its flow from the stairs, could only see the foam and the mist of the water splashing and rumbling into the depths ... Before the Putrih klavže, with the riverbed almost 13 m lower from the mouth of klavže doors, the 7,000 m² of wood was put together, which in the length of 115 m covered all of the riverbed up to the channel’s altitude in klavže. But the water lifted all of this timber weighting 4,000 tons. Once the accumulated wood had moved, the constant inflow of the water was relentlessly pushing it forward. Klavža upheld it.”